Inhabit: A Permaculture Perspective

In Environment, Sustainability by Carlos Espinal, INHC0 Comments

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Carlos Espinal, INHC

Executive Director at 100th Seed Project
A long time activist for social change, Carlos has been involved with many non-profit organizations and community outreach groups dealing with struggles such as police brutality and accountability, immigrant rights, homelessness, and poverty in the inner city. Always passionate about change and how so many issues today overlap he discovered the one thing that connects us all is right in front of our eyes, on our plates. In 2013 he Co-Founded 100th Seed after meeting like minds at MAMNYC. His obsession with food justice lead him to the Institute for Integrative Nutrition where he learned of many different dietary theories and how to better assist people who desire a healthier lifestyle by becoming a Certified Holistic Health Coach. He firmly believes that if you want the world to change you must be the change you want to see and through his work hopes to empower others to do so.
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Inhabit is a feature length documentary introducing permaculture: a design method that offers an ecological lens for solving issues related to agriculture, economics, governance, and on. The film presents a vast array of projects, concepts, and people, and it translates the diversity of permaculture into something that can be understood by an equally diverse audience. For those familiar, it will be a call to action and a glimpse into what’s possible – what kind of projects and solutions are already underway. For those unfamiliar, it will be an introduction to a new way of being and a new way of relating to the Earth. For everyone, it will be a reminder that humans are capable of being planetary healing forces.

Focused mostly on the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States, Inhabit provides an intimate look at permaculture peoples and practices. During the Spring, Summer, and Fall of 2013, film makers Costa Boutsikaris and Emmett Brennan documented over 20 sites in a range of rural, suburban, and urban environments. They explored a breadth of response to local and global challenges from issues of food, water, and medicine, to governance, economy, and culture.

In 2012, after finishing a Permaculture Design Course in NYC and graduating from film school, Costa raised funds on KickStarter to convert a diesel van to run on Waste Vegetable Oil. The money was also used to buy an 80 Watt solar panel to create a renewable energy film vehicle that could allow for mobile editing and camera charging.

The following spring Emmett joined on and the two set off on a 4 month journey, visiting around 22 permaculture sites. Filming wrapped in the Autumn of 2013 and by April of 2014 Costa and Emmett launched a new Kickstarter campaign to raise money for editing/post production. After 8 days they surpassed their goal of $18,000 and eventually raised over $35,000 total.

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